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>>> this sunday, the allied strike against libya stretches into its second week as the u.s. seeks to limit its role. >> responsibility for this operation is being transferred from the united states to our nato allies and partners. >> but as criticism from congress mounts, many questions remain. what happens if gadhafi clings to power? what are the limits of the u.s.'s role if a civil war gets worse? and how does a military campaign relate to our overall strategy in the mideast? this morning, a special joint interview, with us, the secretary of state hillary clinton and secretary of defense robert gates. >>> then -- the president faces critics from both sides of the aisle. did he overstep his constitutional authority by using force without consulting congress. my interview this morning with republican from indiana senator richard lugar. >>> finally, analysis of the administration's handling of the crisis in libya is our fragile economic recovery continues and our military is stretched thin by two other wars, did the president make the case to the american people that libya is worth
safe for infants, i'm wolf blitzer, you're in the "situation room." in a span of 24 hours, the u.s. military said the coalition launched more than 50 strikes in the mission to protect libyan civilians. but no indication the battle is being over. just a short while ago the secretary of state warned gadhafi the quickest way to end it is for him to leave.<[kyk: . we2íor certainly encouraged the would make a right decision. not only institute a real co comprehensive cease-fire but withdraw from the cities and military abs and prepare for a transition that does not incl e include. >> there are serious reports of major clashes under way. what do we know about the fighting at this moment. >> you just heard secretary of state hillary clinton encouraging momammar gadhafi bu he's not backing down. a couple of major developments that shows that this conflict is far from over. anded stage is set from what could be a lengthy and complicated conflict. let's start with a strategically strategic city. then gadhafi forces took it over. when the momentum shifted back to the opposition forces and t
new york, good night, america. >> chris: two major defections from the libyan regime as the u.s. begins covert operations on the ground. day closer to a government shutdown. there are still big roadblocks to a deal. the interstate fight over the 2012 presidential primaries. live from the studio in washington, this is "special report." good evening, i'm chris wallace in for bret baier. another high-ranking libyan official has defected from muammar gaddafi's regime, making two in as many days. a european diplomat describes it as rats fleeing from a sinking ship. defense secretary gates says there won't be american boots on the ground, despite president obama's authorization of covert cia operations. the allied coalition is wiped out estimateed 25% of gaddafi's forces. rebels are still losing ground. forcing lawmakers on capitol hill to ask what is next? white house correspondent mike emanuel is tracking the story. mike? >> reporter: good evening. senior white house officials are pleased, control of the air operation over libya was transferred today from the u.s. to nato. now there
in jerusalem killed one person and wounded more than 50. israel's ambassador to the u.s. says that the bombing does not appear related to militants' recent rocket attacks on southern israel. >>> defense secretary robert gates met with his israeli counterpart in tel aviv today. and he is urging the israelis to restart peace negotiations with the palestinians. defense officials say that gates believes israel can get ahead of the pop ulous wave across the middle east by pressing a peace deal. >>> and hundreds of potential jurors are at the los angeles county courthouse today. 12 will be chosen to decide whether michael jackson's doctor goes to prison. dr. conrad murray is charged with giving jackson an overdose of an anesthetic. opening statements in the trial are set for may. >>> now more for our top story. there are safety concerns at reagan national airport. after two pilots were unable to reach the control tower before landing. our sandra endo is in washington with details. first of all, sandra, the flight landed safely, but there's still so many questions here. the real issue, why the contro
, by any method. >> now, in a u.s. military briefing just a couple of hours ago, we were told there was no indication gadhafi's forces are moving away from either misrata or ajdabiya. cnn's nic robertson is in the capital city of tripoli. nic, tell me what you have been seeing there if the last 24 hours and also how gadhafi's defiance, if at all, has changed some of the forces within the capital city. >> reporter: well, one of the things we've seen really that reflects the fact that this no-fly zone seems to be fully in place is overnight last night, just before dawn this morning, we heard what sounded like jet aircraft flying overhead and then several loud explosions. so it does give the impression that the coalition can fly and can target locations in and around the city. effectively, it would seem like almost with impunity right now. ajdabiya is a red line for gadhafi. as government officials, they want to hold on to the city. it does appear they're not moving their forces out. the same with misrata. the impression is although a couple of coalition strikes overnight diminis
on u.s. actions in libya. that speech is scheduled for monday, 7:30 p.m. eastern time. watch it live right here on the fox news channel. >> heather: as we reported at the top of the show we do have new reaction coming to the death of an american pioneer led the way for women and politics, broke that glass ceiling. >> gregg: joining us -- do we have -- apparently we don't. july july with the latest. >> julie: after suffering complications of blood cancer she had battled for 12 years, geraldine ferraro was surrounded by her family when she passed away this morning at massachusetts general hospital. and president obama just moments ago, he says he will forever be remembered as a trail blazer that broke down barriers for women. whether it was at a public school, a teacher, an assistant district attorney, member of congress or candidate for vice president. she fought to uphold the founding ideals of quality and justice and opportunity for all. she leaves behind her husband, three children and eight grandchildren. in a statement her family says geraldine ferraro was widely known as a leade
for the u.s. in the battle against al qaeda and several hundred loyalists, still scattered around yemen, back country and, seizure of that weapons plant is a blow in that fight. president obama is preparing to address the situation in libya tomorrow night and his decision to intervene has been criticized from both sides of the aisle, some say it came too late. others argue, we shouldn't be involved at all and the president defending his move, saying this weekend it this our national interest. what does the president need to say to get the country on board. david drucker joins us from "roll call", to say it is in our national interest, that is a stretch? >> i don't think it is a stretch but the president has to forcefully and clearly make the case, i think the problem he has had is he did not address the nation on television the moment we went into libya on that saturday and this is something the emerging market have some to expect from presidents -- >> gregg: he's doing it under pressure now. >> i don't know if that is it or, in his mind now is the time. one of the problems the presiden
american fighters jets are active at the moment, u.s. pilots flew 113 of the 175 coalition air sorties yesterday, for example, that u.s. role will shrink dramatically in the next few days leaving others to decide on military targeting. on the ground all public signals from the regime suggest continued defiance and continued attacks on the opposition. but here's the intriguing nugget. senior u.s. officials tell cnn tonight that some members of gadhafi's inner circle are reaching out to the state department and reaching out to other arab nations, as well. curious contacts to say the least but as yet our sources tell us no indication gadhafi himself is looking to negotiate an exit strategy. >> i think there are any number of possible outcomes here, and no one is in a position to predict them. whether they're -- whether there are major further defections or divisions within his family, there are a variety of possibilities that seems to me. >> a variety of possibilities but listen here, secretary gates isn't betting on a peaceful settlement. >> gadhafi has basically sworn that he will show
to he reclaim ground they had lost. >> that said, secretary gates, would the u.s. supply arms to the rebels? >> no decision has been made about that at this point. the security council resolution would permit it, the second resolution, 1973, would permit it. but no decisions have been made by our government about that. >> but does this administration want to see the rebels prevail and overtake gadhafi? >> i think the president's policy is that it's time for gadhafi to go. that's not part of our military mission, which has been very limited and very strictly defined. >> how is that going to happen? secretary clinton you said this week you thought you were picking up signals that he wanted to get out of his own accord. >> well, there are many different aspects to the strategy that the international community is pursuing. as bob has said, the military mission has gone very well. it only started just eight days ago so it has been remarkably well coordinated and focused and now nato will take command and control over it. at the same time, we are pursuing really strict economic sanc
up to speed on march 31st. >>> u.s. intelligence source says cia operatives are on the ground in libya today to size up rebel fighters. the source says they are not there for battlefield direction. congress asked defense secretary robert gates about the cia story a short time ago. >> do you see the use of cia and u.s. special forces in libya as following the blueprint we used in afghanistan? >> first of all, i can't speak to any cia activities, but i will tell you that the president has been quite clear that in terms of the united states' military there will be no boots on the ground. >> britain says it has not promised immunity to libya's top diplomat. foreign minister moussa koussa defected wednesday. they say this man moi be a treasure trove of information. >> reporter: it's significant for many reasons, not the least of which he was former head of intelligence. not least of which is because he was at one time a wanted figure by european security services. this is a man whose disappearance here wasn't even known by the deputy foreign minister. >> libyan rebels remain in ful
. of course, it's been french, british, u.s. fighter jets that have been launching most of the air strikes. again, today another set of air strikes, according to a french official, in or near tripoli targeting a command center, brooke. >> reza, here is a new town, we're all learning, gadhafi's birthplace. we know the rebels are moving westward toward sirte. is that the next big battle, symbolic battle as well, for rebels here? >> reporter: well, it looks like it's the first battle in about three days. the opposition forces over the past 72 hours have been making it look relatively easy, rolling toward the west. this is the first time they're seeing resistance, little bit of fighting. that's probably because sirte is the hometown, the birthplace of colonel gadhafi. he has a lot of supporters, not clear how many have remained in this location. his tribe is based out of this place. rebel fighters telling cnn they're seeing some resistance, telling us that gadhafi loyalists using sha containry, trickery. one rebel fighter telling us that it looks like civilians have been armed. opposition figh
about the lack of air support from nato. as the u.s. and its allies consider whether or not to arm the ragtag opposition forces. providing arms could also mean sending in military trainers that would expand america's involvement even as president obama told brian williams that the u.s. has already accomplished its goals. >> now what we have done is accomplish what we set out to do at the outset, which is to make sure benghazi was not overrun and that thousands potentially of people were not killed. what we have also done is put gadhafi back on his heels. >> brian williams, of course, is the anchor and managing editor of "nbc nightly news" and joins me now. >> sometimes it is nightly noise. >> and most recently there is a lot of nightly concern about what is happening in libya what is happening with the rebels. you asked the key question. and asked whether or not we should be arming the rebels. let's look at part of that exchange. >> with all due respect, mr. president, watching the reportings of our two correspondents in libya, what it appears the rebels need is military equipment.
will speak to the nation tonight to further explain the u.s. mission in libya. good morning, everyone. it is monday, march 28th. welcome to "morning joe." with us on set, msnbc and "time" magazine senior political analyst mark halperin. you're going to be driving the week today. >> i will be doing some of that. >> national affairs editor for "new york" magazine, john heilemann and msnbc political analyst pat buchanan in the studio here this morning. i love that. >> pat in the flesh. >> you're okay after that accident. >> i hope the other people are okay. >> it doesn't sound like it. hope everyone had a good weekend. i had another trip to the e.r. what else is new? >> oh, my. >> kids. we have a lot going on today. she's fine. thanks for asking. >> you're here. >> sprained ankle. no, not me. we have a lot going on today. we talk about the president's address to the nation tonight, how the libya mission plays into the obama doctrine. i think it does. also, in the 7:00 a.m. hour we'll bring in the executive editor of "rolling stone" magazine, eric bates. "rolling stone" is out with anothe
. and in about 45 minutes, former u.s. comp then, political strategist maria cardona and john feehery and we will discuss the arab world with a former u.s. ambassador to morocco, marc ginsburg. on this channel, "washington journal" is next, live with your phone calls. later today, we will give you a brown paper -- roundtable that will include the mayor of boston, st. paul, the minnesota, green though, mississippi, and sacramento, california. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] host: the video on your screen is some of the latest footage on the air raids in libya, courtesy of the aljazeera network. with the president act in town, questions are being raised about u.s. policy and goals in libya. that is our discussion this morning on the "washington journal" as we go through the newspapers. what do you think? how is the president handling the libya conflict so far? 202 is the area code -- how do you think the president is handling the libyan conflict. yesterday speaker john boehner sent this letter to the president. speaker boehner list several questions he asks the question
york, good night, america. >>> the u.s. considers arming libyan rebels to beat back pro-gaddafi forces. but is al-qaeda a concern? president obama tries a pivot from the rest of the middle east for greater energy independence. military hopes to change culture to prevent suicides. live from our studio in washington, this is "special report." i'm chris wallace in for bret baier. muammar gaddafi's forces are making gain against rebel fighters. having recaptured ras lanouf and making advance to the capital of tripoli. native airstrikes kept the army mostly at bay, the coalition is looking into new tactics including possibly arming the rebels. correspondent james rosen has the latest from the state department. james? >> reporter: chris, good evening. fox news confirmed that president obama has been considering a secret order known as finding to authorize broad away of covert operations in the libya. tonight reuters is reporting that the order has been signed sometime in the last two or three weeks. under heavy mortar and artillery fire, they moved east, another sign that ground forces loyal
that the white house says nato will take greater command authority leading to more questions as to who u.s. troops respond to. is it the u.s. military or nato? the present will talk about this tomorrow. guest: this shows that there is a concern at the white house about congress and the broader american public if they understand the mission or support the mission. that will be an issue for the next few days for the white house to address this and obama to define what his ideas are and how he wants to get there. host: we have the aljazeera washington chief and we have the reporter for "the washington post." good morning. caller: i am curious -- does any of this have to do with the arab countries and the turmoil? the issue that nobody wants to talk about has to be there. it has to be included in cnn. it is the country of israel. we have to get the shield away and not be able -- afraid to talk about the issues of israel and the palestinians. host: we will put that issue on the table right now. thank you. guest: the viewer raises a very important point. israel has as we all know, for several de
and exit strategy. talking about the same thing. what does it mean when the u.s. pulls back? nato allies are saying they don't have a plan in place to take over for the u.s. and one stumbling block. what happens to colonel gadhafi if he stays in power after this bombardment and pressure what then does the u.s. do? they have made clear that the u.n. resolution authorizing this in the eyes of the white house does not call for regime change and pushing gadhafi out. the white house wants him to go and the president said if he doesn't leave, then what, carol? >> so many up answered questions. ed henry, live at the white house, thanks so much. >>> more anti-government protests taking place taking places throughout the world. yemen legislature voted in favor of a state of emergency and vote came despite an appeal from government opponents who say it could lead to a new, quote, massacre. >>> syria, 15 people were killed during protests demanding government reforms. the u.s. state department says it is deeply troubled by these civilian deaths. syrian state television says the governor of the prov
traffic control procedures. u.s. transportation secretary ray lahood calling for at least two air traffic controllers now to man overnight shifts. this after a controller at d.c.'s reagan national airport reportedly fell asleep and two planes couldn't get in touch with the tower after mid night just trying to land. both had to go in for a landing on their own. toes your headlines. >> five hour energy ran out and two planes had to do their own thing. >> i'm sure nothing's down there on the runway. let's cross our fingers. let's talk a little bit about what's going on right now. in libya, new video just in, one of qaddafi's bases reportedly destroyed by u.s. coalition air strikes. look at these pictures, showing a flaming wreckage overnight and qaddafi's compound in tripoli also reportedly targeted again and was struck. the commander of britain's royal air force says libya's air force no longer exists. >> so now that we also have an exclusive story that came to us, i think james rosen and jennifer griffin working on this together. essentially, there might be some break as we try to find o
. as of right now it appears that u.s. warplanes will still lead the more difficult mission, attacking the gadhafi ground forces. nbc's jim maceda is live. and richard engel live from the town offage agefag agfag agfafe . >>> we're getting confirmation three months plus or mys now. obviously there'll be adjustments. that mission should begin early next week. there will be dozens of planes from 28 nato countries including the two arab countries, qatar and the eub. right now nato is going to decide on sunday, no latter than tuesday on those two missions, the no-fly zone patrol obviously but also that they be caring out those air-to-ground strikes or will it keep it the way things are and have that done by the u.s.-led coalition. also the no-fly zones by the gadhafi forces. # in reality that's probably two or three fighter jets. there were air strikes, andrea, in tripoli overnight. a number of explosions. after the first time in a week they could another hear the artillery fire in the skies. also there's an ongoing war of the air waves if you will. the latest being a funeral. many of the
. violence rips law the middle east and the arab world. and now the u.s. is handed over control of the no-fly zone to nato but the u.s. military is still deeply involved. so what is going on? a live report moments away. and a muslim teacher asks for three weeks off to go on a pilgrimage and the school says "no way," she did not work there long enough and the department of justice is suing the school. what is up with that? >> states want to tax big corporations to fix their deficit instead of changing policy so now one big company, caterpillar, employs thousands of people, is ready to flee illinois. could this happen in your state? we continue right now with "fox and friends" this morning. >> welcome, everyone. you are watching "fox and friends" today. >> welcome to "fox and friends" on saturday morning. thank you for waking up with us. that is dave briggs and heather is here and i am clayton. >> lots going on today. >>dave: we start with new developments in libya where rebels have retaken the key town of ajdabiya after a fierce battle with muammar qaddafi forces and rick is live inside th
's forces driving the opposition fighters back from their earlier gains and now the u.s. and its allies still not ruling out the possibility of arming the rebels. where are we now? good morning, everybody, welcome here, i'm bill hemmer live in "america's newsroom". how you doing martha? martha: doing well, bill, good to see you, folks. there's a lot going on. i'm martha maccallum. as you can see, there's heavy fire in the town of ras lanuf, a town the rebels thought they had taken back, now they fight a wave of nato air strikes, forces loyal to qaddafi once again back on the advance and putting the rebels in a very tough situation, pinned down by huge rockets, qaddafi's mob said to be closing in once again. bill: rec leventhal, leading our coverage, he has moved to the east of ras lanuf and what that is happened in this battle, rick? >> reporter: good morning, bill and martha. we just lost power in adjabiya, this town fell to qaddafi troops, regained by the rebels and could be taken over once again by qaddafi's troops. they have been striking rebel positions west of us in the town of ra
of the house of representatives are troubled that u.s. military resources were committed to war without clearly defining for the american people, the congress, and our troops what the mission in libya is and what america's role is in achieving that mission. what should the president do now? should he address the nation? should he meet with members of congress? all of the above? >> maybe all of the above. and i think the way boehner handled that letter was very thoughtful. he waited until the president was back on u.s. soil. as i understand the congressional briefings to date, what happened was bill burns, who's our undersecretary of state for policy briefed the senate on thursday afternoon as they were leaving town. on friday, the president convened the leadership of congress. however, it was a recess day. so most of them were hicked in te telephonically and the telephone didn't work so well. maybe he should have sent a plane to pick them up. but in any event, that briefing was not fully satisfactory. some members said, well, we're just going to be in the back of the line and we're not going to
on the ground were the clearest indication that intensive air strikes carried out by the u.s., french and naval assets over the past week have softened up the libyan military considerably. meanwhile, the front page of " the new york times" - below the fold in the new york times, there's a story on the event recovered live on c-span yesterday. this is prompting us to ask republicans to define what will define the gop primary. with that, republicans only -- 202 the area code. our first call is from ardmore, oklahoma. caller: good morning. i believe the people of united states, their first concern is the economy. another thing we have to be concerned about is full disclosure. in this administration under obama, there has never been such hit in things. he spends money like going to brazil and giving out this money. they owe us tons of money. under the clinton years clinton lent them $100 billion. it goes on and on and on. when did congress lose the power of the purse? the other thing which is the greatest thing in our nation is we have to come back to god and of this nation repents if my people cal
the u.s. found itself fighting in a country that even the defense secretary says is not a vital united states interest. we'll break down the challenge he faces tonight. >>> plus, there's a lot at stake in libya for president obama. is it possible that politically failure in libya hurts a lot more for the president than victory would help him? >>> when republicans thought it was safe to get back to talking about smaller government, a conference in iowa this weekend has some republicans worried the state is becoming a social conservative outpost and the wrong place to vet candidates for 2012. once again, it was people with very little chance of ever being nominated like michelle bachmann, who had all the applause lines. >>> and new lu elected governors mostly republicans, gave the voters what they asked for -- spending cuts and hope that they'd see their poll numbers move. they're moved all right, downhill. and finally, hbo's bill maher will be on "hardball" tomorrow night. we bring you what his perfect presidential kaed will look like. >>> we start in libya tonight. richard engel is in
and the u.s. on plans in libya. since that speech is, rebels armed with anti-aircraft guns have been rooted by gadhafi forces firing from thanks and artillery. the question is this. does the coles need to arm the rebels with weapons capable of taking on gadhafi's force ss? speaking to brian williams, the president said he's not ruling it out. >> we're still making an assessment partly about what gadhafi's forces are going to be doing. we're not taking anything off the table at this point. >> nbc's mike viqueira is live at the white house. vick, so the president playing it safe? >> you might say that. the administration has maintained since the beginning of this that the united states security council resolution that is the grounds for all of this military action permits the arming of the rebels. there are obviously a lot of pitfalls here starting with the history of such a practice. you look back in american history terrorist afghanistan with the mujahadin, many of those arms turned against amicfoes gollhe wba go anotr atitidung t '70s and '80s. nicaragua would be another example. fraught
.p.a. regs hanging over their head. the regulatory flexibility act. shaded areas indicate u.s. you is session. the 2009 research -- that's the word i can't read, organizations. look at how this is. this is what's happening from regulations. it's going up. on the unemployment scale. the r.e.f. requires the federal agencies to assess the economic impact on small business, we talked about that. to come up with alternatives because unemployment rates are around or above 9% for the past 22 months, it's time that we make these regulations be assessed and seven out of 10 of the new jobs are created by these small businesses. when you hear us talk about the pesticide act, it's very clear, there's the folks that are dealing with it right there. the farmers of america. and it's duplicative. that means they already have a permit that allows them to put out these pesticides and because of this ruling they're having to make -- get another permit at another cost and meet other guidelines for these pesticides. the sixth circuit, we think with this, made a bad ruling and these higher costs to producers and c
it comes to how the u.s. would get involved in, say, a syria or a yemen or pbahrain. it seems as if officials today, the whole goal of this briefing was to make sure reporters understood that libya was not a precedent for anything. >> well, it was very striking this weekend on "meet the press" to watch secretary gates and secretary clinton trying to define first from the defense secretary, defining what is in our national interests. this was gates first and then clinton. >> no, i don't think it's vital interest for the united states, but we clearly have interests there and it's a part of the region which is a vital interest for the united states. >> i think a lot of people would hear that and say that's quite striking. not in our vital interests and yet we're committing military resources to it. >> but then it wouldn't be fair to what bob just said. did hib ilibya attack us? no, they did not attack us. >> but they did have interest with our allies and our allies have been standing with the united states in afghanistan for a decade when they were not attacked. so that's the cas
to his claim the u.s. will take a backseat in libya now nato has taken over. according to the ap: >> sean: joining me with more in studio is mark steyn. how are you? >> great to be with you. >> sean: the president has argued our interests and values cannot be separated. this caused what happened in libya? >> this has nothing to do with president obama. even this administration cannot be so narcissistic. this is in fact the post american middle east we are seeing in the formation here. when people -- he sat on the sidelines in the egyptian revolution. obama sometimes he said mubarak should stay, he should go. >> sean: supported them, neutral, opposed. >> he took every position. the guys in the street in tahrir square despiseed obama for that. in iran he took the side of the thugs of the mullahs and their henchmen. in libya these people have put up with this whacky, psychotic transvestite for 40 years and they are sick of him. >> sean: i didn't hear the mad dog referred to as the mad transvestite. what do you think the psychology is? i study obama and i have my own theory. i think there's a
that the u.s. should establish a no-fly zone over libya. >> what would you do about libya? >> exercise a no-fly zone this evening. communicate to the libyan military that gadhafi was gone. and that the sooner they switch sides, the more likely they were to survive. provide help to the rebels to replace him. this this is a moment to get rid of him, do it, get it over with. the united states doesn't need anybody's permission. >> do you think moammar gadhafi has to go as a result of intervention. >> i would not have intervened. i think there are allies in the region that we could have worked with. i would not have used american and european forces. >> all right. >> wait, wait, wait. i don't understand that. hold on. >> he says on his facebook page that the two statements are not a contradiction. believe that. and that the bottom line is that he wishes the u.s. military hadn't gotten involved militarily. >> let's go to ouring inning nh desk at 30 rock. mikey, in that first clip with greta -- >> come on, mike. >> he did not talk about throwing the kitchen sink at gadhafi. everything else was th
are routine, about once a month, and that realistically, killing a u.s. agent along the border is bad for business. it makes it more difficult to get your load across and make money because you get more agents, money, resources. having said that, this is the reality that these guys are dealing with. megyn? megyn: thank you, william. this report is one day after the homeland security department announced a $5 million reward in the shooting of jaime zapata last month. they were ambushed last month in mexico. zapata and his partner were shot several times. zapata died of his injuries. they were there to help the mexican government with its drug war. some arrests have been made, but the investigation is ongoing. this is another extreme weather alert for you, as we watch the storms moving across florida. mother nature is playing a cruel april fools joke on the snow-weary northeast. look at that pink. powerful storm developing. forecasters warn that it will intensify bringing strong winds and heavy, wet snow along the east coast. they're warning folks to prepare for power outages and major
making the case there's too much hungner the u.s. and it's government's responsibility to help. they're also making visits to capitol hill urging members of congress to find other areas to cut and continue food assistance to the poor. >> i know jim wallace. we were speaking at a hunger strike. we're going to talk to him tomorrow about what he's doing. jessica, thank you very much. >>> a lot of you have been tweeting me about the weather. you in florida, severe weather. slamming florida right now. take a look at the very colorful radar. we'll have pictures with the latest damage next. but first, want to go to stephanie elam with some freel money advice. >> time now for the help desk where we get answers to your financial questions. with me right now, donna rosato and lynn net cox is a writer. thank you for being with us. our first question from jeff in michigan. he writes i'm underwater on my home but no one will help me because i'm unemployed. i have paid my mortgage on time but told i could get help if i stop. what should i do? we hear this so often. >> it's never a good idea to sto
even though libya is not vital to u.s. interests? that's the question. joining us now, dick morris, former advisor to president clinton and the author of the new book "revolt." all right. that's the question for you. >> well, i think that -- i wrote this in a column on my web site dickmorris.com. this guy is playing checkers when he should be playing chess. he's moving the pieces one at a time without thinking five moves down the road. so ok, we're intervening from the air to protect civilians from mass slaughter. all right, that's good right now. now, what happens if we can't get rid of qaddafi and he continues to slaughter the people? you're going to send in ground troops or just say, ok, now we'll turn a blind eye. let's say we get rid of qaddafi and then an iraq style civil war breaks out where his cronies and political party goes underground challenging the rebels with ongoing terrorist tactics like happened in iraq. are we going to turn a blind eye to that? at what point do you disengage. at what point do the libyan rebels take over and turn out to be heavily infiltrated by a
assault, assistance from the u.s. and other air forces. i am against it. i think, again, if the french and other allies feel they have a strategic interest in taking this battle on behalf of opposition all the way to tripoli, then let them land of the foreign legion in tripoli and let them take on this fight. this is what the french government wants. they have a greater stake in the outcome than we do come and they do not think the united states has a core strategic interests getting involved any more than the military has done so, despite the clamoring of the opposition. this is something that is really of no great consequence to the united states, and that our allies want to take on the responsibility for this fight, we should let them do so. host: let's conclude with this question. what do you think will happen in libya, and if or when he leaves, who is his successor? guest: unless he continues to get hammered by other air forces, other than ourselves, he will continue to hold on. there is some hope on the part of the secretary of defense gates that there would be divisions within h
back to world war ii. are you ruling out u.s. military hardware assistance? >> i'm not ruling it out but i'm also not ruling it in. we're not taking anything off the table at this point. our primary military goal is to protect civilian populations and set up the no-fly zone. our primary strategic goal is for gadhafi to step down so the libyan people have an opportunity to live a decent life. >> we'll get to some of the other questions around this, including the double standard as it pertains to syria and other countries and whether or not the president should have gone to congress. first let's go around the table. pat, i'll start with you. if we arm the rebels aren't you in a sense going after gadhafi in the biggest way, which is something we were not going to do. >> you're much more openly doing what you're actually doing anyhow. >> exactly. >> you're getting into the war more deeply on the side of the folks who want to ouflt gadhafi. it will be a longer and bloodier war between gadhafi's forces and the rebels, you put all that equipment in there. it will be a real hellish mess. >>
say really quickly, there are two institutions. i'm leaving out an important institution, the u.s. military and willie geist. >> i know. >> you look at willie geist's poll numbers. >> look at him. >> do you trust him to read your sports every morning? >> do you want me to do sports this morning. >> better if we don't, mika, with due respect. >>> i've been pushing this yankees as david, red sox as goliath. the new york papers, check this out, the yankees, the little team that could. >> what is that? >> and look at this one, hot dogs -- >> highest payroll in sports. >> hot dog as in underdogs. the yankees are the hot underdog in baseball. beautiful yankee stadium. there it s. that's a little team. >> that's a beautiful mall. seriously. >> there's great shopping in there, joe. there really is. for a lot of people, today is the best dave the year. opening day of major league baseball. here's some of the games, a breakdown. you have the yankees opening. hopefully if the weather holds up against the tigers. the drives, a lot of people picking them to win that division. the nats if that
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